Relaxation for Stress Relief

May 21, 2021
Relaxing

This content is courtesy of Mayo Clinic, the No. 1 hospital in the nation according to U.S. News & World Report. Middlesex Health is a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. This relationship provides us with access to information, knowledge and expertise from Mayo Clinic.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, which makes this a good time to learn more about managing the stress in your life.

Stress is an automatic physical, mental and emotional response to a challenging event. It's a normal part of everyone's life. When used positively, stress can lead to growth, action and change. But negative, long-term stress can lessen your quality of life and put your health at risk.

One of the first steps toward good stress management is understanding how you react to stress — and making changes if necessary. Take a look at how you react to stress, and then adopt or modify stress management techniques to make sure the stress in your life doesn't lead to health problems.

Relaxation techniques are a great way to help with stress management. Relaxation isn't only about peace of mind or enjoying a hobby. Relaxation is a process that decreases the effects of stress on your mind and body.

In general, relaxation techniques involve refocusing your attention on something calming and increasing awareness of your body. It doesn't matter which relaxation technique you choose. What matters is that you try to practice relaxation regularly to reap its benefits.

Learn more about relaxation techniques that can reduce stress symptoms and help you enjoy a better quality of life.

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